How to cut and fold sandpaper or how to cut wet or dry sandpaper. This is a quick video on how to fold and rip your sandpapers without using scissors. Scissors or other cutting tools can put a curved hardened edge to sandpapers and that can cause scratches when sanding. To avoid unwanted edges and keep from dulling out scissors, try my method. I also make note of how writing on the back of sandpaper with a hard tip pen can actually create an outward impression that can also put scratches in what your sanding.

 

There are a variety of sandpapers on the market but not all are recommended to be used on cars. There many wood working sandpapers that yes could work in body work but may create undesired results. You wouldn’t want to use a belt sander on working body filler and some wood working and craft type sandpapers will either dull really fast, get packed up with debris or put serious sand scratches in what you are trying to smooth and surface.

Under normal conditions, meaning the vehicle needs the surface sanded down to feather edge chips, paint or clear peeling, you would normally start off with 180 or 220 grit DA (Dual Action Sander) paper. The most common now is 6 inch sticky back or hook and loop (Velcro) backed. The most likely step would be to prime with a urethane primer and from there you can wet sand with a fist pass of 320 grit and then 400 grit for the final sand.

Once you have painted your vehicle you may want to wet sand the paint or clear to give it a cleaner more factory finish. If the paint finish went on relatively smooth and the orange peel is pretty much where you want it, you can start of with 1500 grit. Then go in steps going to 2000 grit and then you can finish it up with 3000 grit.

3M AutoAll of these products can be obtained through 3M, they also offer a great buffing compound process which will give you amazing results. Even if you are just trying to bring back an old paint job. Check out all of what 3M has to offer and for pricingĀ  Click Here

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